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Off Topic on Adult (=regenerative) cell technology, but very much related i.e. pills and drugs of which we do not know if they work
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TOPIC: Mannitol- a sugar alcohol

Mannitol- a sugar alcohol 01 Jan 2015 13:08 #3029

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The topic started on Okyanos a few days back, brought the example of Okyanos treating patients with neurological disorders, which all appears to have - let´s say- a bit more impact than originally expected. Actually- just smiles so far. :winky:

The article I copied from the Okyanos website on treating neurological disorders, included the line on injecting Mannitol about a half hour before injecting cells intravenously, in order for the cells to have an easier time to pass the blood-brain barrier of the patient.

I did not have a clue what Mannitol was- the usual presumption that I normally have. is of some kind of rare compound heavily IP protected by a BP company.

To my surprise- when I googled it tonight- its a simple sugar alcohol, similar to sucrose, which is used in artificial sweeteners... :happy: :happy:

So no patent possibilities- probably the same old story- excellent medicine but not "scientifically proven" since it does not pay. Same story as lentrile for cancer treatment.... and and and.... :cry: :cry:



read this article- highly interesting.. :nice:

Artificial sweeteners may have some complicated side-effects or contra-indications for people with existing health effects. But artificial sweeteners could help people beyond losing weight, cavity prevention and reducing blood sugar: a new study from Israel has found that mannitol, widely used in chewing gum, could slow down the effects of Parksinson’s disease.

Mannitol, a sugar alcohol produced by fungi, bacteria, and algae, now was originally isolated from the secretions of the flowering ash and called manna after its resemblance to the Biblical food.

Besides gum, the sweetener is also used in the medical field — it’s approved by the FDA in the US as a diuretic to flush out excess fluids and used during surgery as a substance that opens the blood/brain barrier to ease the passage of other drugs.

In the new research study Profs. Ehud Gazit and Daniel Segal have found that mannitol also prevents clumps of the protein α-synuclein from forming in the brain — a process that is characteristic of Parkinson’s disease. This disease can appear in normal populations, but is linked also to pesticide and chemical exposure – see our story about the Bedouins in Beersheva, Israel.

These results, published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry and presented at the Drosophila Conference in Washington, DC in April, suggest that this artificial sweetener could be a novel therapy for the treatment of Parkinson’s and other neurodegenerative diseases.

After identifying the structural characteristics that facilitate the development of clumps of α-synuclein, the researchers began to hunt for a compound that could inhibit the proteins’ ability to bind together. In the lab, they found that mannitol was among the most effective agents in preventing aggregation of the protein in test tubes. The benefit of this substance is that it is already approved for use in a variety of clinical interventions, Prof. Segal says.

Next, to test the capabilities of mannitol in the living brain, the researchers turned to transgenic fruit flies engineered to carry the human gene for α-synuclein.

To study fly movement, they used a test called the “climbing assay,” in which the ability of flies to climb the walls of a test tube indicates their locomotive capability.

In the initial experimental period, 72 percent of normal flies were able to climb up the test tube, compared to only 38 percent of the genetically-altered flies.

The researchers then added mannitol to the food of the genetically-altered flies for a period of 27 days and repeated the experiment. This time, 70 percent of the mutated flies could climb up the test tube. In addition, the researchers observed a 70 percent reduction in aggregates of α-synuclein in mutated flies that had been fed mannitol, compared to those that had not.

These findings were confirmed by a second study which measured the impact of mannitol on mice engineered to produce human α-synuclein, developed by Dr. Eliezer Masliah of the University of San Diego.

After four months, the researchers found that the mice injected with mannitol also showed a dramatic reduction of α-synuclein in the brain.

The researchers now plan to re-examine the structure of the mannitol compound and introduce modifications to optimize its effectiveness.

For the time being, mannitol may be used in combination with other medications that have been developed to treat Parkinson’s but which have proven ineffective in breaking through the blood/brain barrier, says Prof. Segal. These medications may be able to “piggy-back” on mannitol’s ability to open this barrier into the brain.

Before you start stocking up on gum — although the results look promising, it is still not advisable for Parkinson’s patients to begin ingesting mannitol in large quantities, Segal cautions. More testing must be done to determine dosages that would be both effective and safe.

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Mannitol- a sugar alkohol 03 Jan 2015 07:09 #3047

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I shared this article on the patients board of Stemcellpioneers.com where this was pretty well known. If one is interested - go over there I search for the word "mannitol" on the board.

The most interesting info I found in the paper- Mannitol-Enhanced Delivery of Stem Cells and Their Growth Factors Across the Blood–Brain Barrier

The abstract reads as follows:

Ischemic brain injury in adults and neonates is a significant clinical problem with limited therapeutic interventions. Currently, clinicians have only tPA available for stroke treatment and hypothermia for cerebral palsy. Owing to the lack of treatment options, there is a need for novel treatments such as stem cell therapy. Various stem cells including cells from embryo, fetus, perinatal, and adult tissues have proved effective in preclinical and small clinical trials. However, a limiting factor in the success of these treatments is the delivery of the cells and their by-products (neurotrophic factors) into the injured brain. We have demonstrated that mannitol, a drug with the potential to transiently open the blood–brain barrier and facilitate the entry of stem cells and trophic factors, as a solution to the delivery problem. The combination of stem cell therapy and mannitol may improve therapeutic outcomes in adult stroke and neonatal cerebral palsy.


and the full paper can be downloaded here:


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Board moderator and Site-owner. I still regret the day I started analysing the prospects of MacroPore (now Cytori) back in 2004- a left-over from the tech-bubble at that time from the century change in my portfolio- and became addicted to Cytori´s fat cell technology. :cry:
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