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TOPIC: Developments at Olympus

Developments at Olympus 10 Apr 2015 04:30 #4143

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I am still keeping an eye on Olympus- well, check them out once every quarter or so- and there is always something to read, which has my interest. :yep:

This time, it is the impression that the inheritance of "Tobashi" i.e. the Woodford and Kikukawa collision, fraud and all the agony following that, is slowly a thing of the past and the relating law suits being settled.

As most of you know- Terumo - a 2,5 % owner of Olympus, tried a hostile take-over of Olympus, which did not succeed and Sony jumped in with a 10% stake.

The news is that Sony just sold half of that stake to JP Morgan with a handsome profit, which their business does not make anymore. :whistle:

I have and still see Olympus as a natural partner for Cytori, since they do not make pills (are NOT BP) - make devices and in the past have proven to be visionary.

Thereto the regulatory pathway and actions by the FDA in respect of fat cells, could be appealing to them.

Time will tell- with Calhoun and Saad gone- nothing should be impossible i.e. Cytori has improved also to some extent.... :whistle: :whistle:

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Board moderator and Site-owner. I still regret the day I started analysing the prospects of MacroPore (now Cytori) back in 2004- a left-over from the tech-bubble at that time from the century change in my portfolio- and became addicted to Cytori´s fat cell technology. :cry:

Developments at Olympus 10 Apr 2015 04:35 #4144

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And just as a surprise- having Calhoun at Cellactive and David Oxley at Lorem Vascular is not all.

In February 2015 an old Cytori hand- Alex Milstein joined Olympus as Executive Director, Medical Affairs



Alex´s profile is as follows:

EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT IN MEDICAL AFFAIRS AND CLINICAL DEVELOPMENT
Medical Devices, Biotechnology, Pharmaceuticals

Results-oriented leader in medical affairs and clinical development with superb record of regulatory approvals, competitive positioning, and optimal reimbursement of medical products worldwide resulting in over US $3.0 billion in revenue. Proven ability to develop, negotiate, and successfully execute global clinical development strategies to support product approvals. Excellent track record of recruiting, developing, and retaining effective cross-functional management teams.
Specialties:
- Medical Devices
- Stem Cell Therapies
- Combination Products
- Pharmaceuticals


Well -Alex really has been in clinical development most of his working life. :grin:
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Board moderator and Site-owner. I still regret the day I started analysing the prospects of MacroPore (now Cytori) back in 2004- a left-over from the tech-bubble at that time from the century change in my portfolio- and became addicted to Cytori´s fat cell technology. :cry:

Developments at Olympus 10 Apr 2015 07:35 #4145

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I also discovered an interesting blog by somebody writing about Olympus and Japanese mentality...

You can visit directly: A Thousand Words Blog

or read a few passages from this blog in the Olympus article....just some quotes, since this is interesting reading which however I have covered on this site also:

On the Ortho business of Olympus
Why Olympus was originally involved in orthopaedic biomaterials in its home country of Japan has also to do with the restrictive nature of the Japanese medical device market. Government regulation makes it very difficult to bring medical devices that were developed in other countries into Japan, leading to the rise of many home grown competitors. Because of the interwoven natural of Japanese corporations, brands and subsidiaries of brands end up in areas that are not available to them in other parts of the world. For example, the Kyocera group, which is known for manufacturing ceramics for electrical components, also applies their knowledge of ceramics to the manufacturing of hip and dental implants. Or take Fujifilm; as the market for traditional photographic film died, the company re-directed their knowledge of manufacturing collagen for film emulsions into creating skin injections for the medical cosmetics industry. However, in considering the restrictive nature of the Japanese regulatory system, favored products elsewhere in the world do not necessarily take hold in Japan.

On bone healing
There is another alternative, and that is to use human bone from a third-party donor. The medical term for this is "allograft," meaning a graft from one who is different from yourself. This is known as tissue donation; it differs from organ donation in that the material is procured from a wider range of deceased individuals. In organ donation, a donated heart or lung is only suitable under a strict set of criteria, usually requiring that the patient pass away in the confines of a hospital with brain death. Tissue donation is not as rigorous, as the material, usually bone, skin and tendon, are procured from the donor body and chemically processed so that they can be implanted in any patient without the fear or rejection. That is, with tissue-donation, there isn't a need to find a precise donor match because the material is cleansed of the organic bio-markers that would trigger an immune response in the recipient body. If this seems a bit ghoulish, it would would understandable. Tissue donation is not consistently practiced across the world, though it is well established in the U.S. and Europe. However, in Japan, rates of tissue donation are especially low. There is a greater barrier to its use than the typical ick factor, and that is the Shinto religion. Actually, religion is a bit of a misnomer... cultural influence is a more accurate term, as most Japanese are not religious in the Western understanding of the word. (There's an old Joke that the Japanese are born Shinto, marry as Christians, and die as Buddhists.) As is befitting a nation that is known for it's obsession with cleanliness and order, the Shinto philosophy is very much concerned with aspects of purity and completeness. The barrier with using donated material from a dead donor is a) It would be viewed as something impure being put into the recipient and b) It would leave the donor's body "incomplete" and be an interference with their final resting state.

On Olympus ambitions in the ortho field
Which brings us back to Olympus. The key for them has been consistency, maintaining a steady reputation in the medical devices field and culturing a dedicated and motivated direct-sales force. The surgeon-rep relationship is king in the medical field, and that is something that doesn't grow overnight. Olympus might have a lock on endoscopy, but it is still taking minuscule baby steps in the field of orthopedics (partnering, going after small bite-sized chunks of the market first), as it does not yet have the groundwork laid by other medical suppliers. It's not even clear if Olympus has long-term intentions to be a credible competitor in the mainline orthopedic field, but as with anything, being known for something means knowing how to do it first... and that takes time for any company... in any field.

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Board moderator and Site-owner. I still regret the day I started analysing the prospects of MacroPore (now Cytori) back in 2004- a left-over from the tech-bubble at that time from the century change in my portfolio- and became addicted to Cytori´s fat cell technology. :cry:
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